I Won’t Apologise (or: On Reading Choices)

A while ago, Jaclyn from Covered in Flour wrote a great post about reading choices and owning them. She mentioned an infamous article that said that adults who read YA novels should be ashamed of themselves, which prompted her to write a post about all of the reading choices she won’t apologise for. I really loved her post since I think it is ridiculous to be ashamed of your reading choices and preferences. Everyone should read whatever they like, and not feel guilty about it. So, I decided to contribute my own list of things (related to reading) I won’t apologise for.

  • I won’t apologise for reading chick lit. I actually wrote an entire post about this back in December, but I’m still not done talking about it. Chick lit often gets looked down upon by people who write it off as simple, predictable stories that are all one of a kind. It’s often true that these stories are rather predictable, but I don’t care about that. Reading chick lit every once in a while makes me happy, since you’re guaranteerd to find a happily ever after at the end of the book. Knowing that is nice sometimes. Plus, these stories are often very witty and just overall feel good.
  • I won’t apologise for having read and liked Twilight. I remember being 17 and just starting university, and not wanting anyone to find out that I liked Twilight because I was an English major now. How stupid was I? There are a lot of things about these books that are kind of cringeworthy, but I loved them at the time. I raced through all four of those books in no time at all. No clue if I’d still like them today, but as for now I have a nice memory of those books.
  • I won’t apologise for being a slow reader. If I see how fast some (most?) of the book bloggers around here go through their books, I’m astonished. I wish I could read that fast, but I definitely can’t. I’ve only read 23 books this year, which is probably a lot for most people, but most certainly not for most book bloggers. Perhaps it has to do with English not being my first language, but I’m not really sure about that, since my English seems to be better than my Dutch these days. I guess I’m just slow. And that’s okay!
  • I won’t apologise for The Fault in Our Stars being my favourite John Green book. Lately, I almost feel like that is something to explain or apologise for. TFiOS has grown into such a hype, and some reason people are less convinced of something being really good if it’s all hyped up. Which is weird if you think about it, since a hype just means a lot of people like something. I’m the same, though. As soon as everybody raves about something, it isn’t attractive to me anymore. Which is why I sometimes feel weird for saying TFiOS is one of my favourite books. Especially to other readers of John Green’s books, since many seem to prefer his earlier work. (On that note: I won’t apologise for calling it TFiOS, ’cause if John Green uses it, I can use it too).
  • I won’t apologise for wanting my books to look pretty. This both refers to wanting the prettiest cover possible for my books, and wanting them to stay undamaged. I’m a bit more lenient when it comes to slightly cracked spines these days, but that’s it as far as I’m concerned. No dog ears, no writing in books (apart from study books, but that’s very difficult for me as well), and as little damage as possible from carrying them around in bags. Oh, and there are few things that bother me more (reading-wise, that is) than books in a series not all being the same edition. That’s just awful. Those spines have to match up!

That’s my list! I’m sure there are many more things I won’t apologise for, but these are all that came to mind right now. What are some bookish habits or choices you won’t apologise for?

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17 thoughts on “I Won’t Apologise (or: On Reading Choices)

  1. I so agree with this! Though I don’t read chick lit, I did read and like Twilight and I love my pretty books! Also, I’m an avid fantasy reader, which was something I used to be embarassed about. These days, I embrace my craving for new worlds and amazing adventures. I feel it’s a great way for me to escape once in awhile.

    And by the way, usually, when YA novels become popular among adults, that means they move into the crossover universe as well 🙂 the world where adults and youngsters come together!

    • I’m not a huge fantasy reader, but I do greatly admire fantasy writers – the way they come up with new worlds, it’s hugely creative. 🙂 We should never be embarrassed about what we read. It’s all a matter of taste in the end, and nothing is inferior to anything else when it comes to taste, I think.

  2. Reblogged this on and commented:
    I so agree with this! Though I don’t read chick lit, I did read and like Twilight and I love my pretty books! Also, I’m an avid fantasy reader, which was something I used to be embarassed about. These days, I embrace my craving for new worlds and amazing adventures. I feel it’s a great way for me to escape once in awhile.

    You are who you are and don’t let the rest of the world change that ❤

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  4. Spine-breakers should have to do community service. Nothing wrong with liking books to look good and stay good. I liked Twilight too and got stick for it, but it didn’t bother me. The last book on the series was disappointing however.

  5. Great list! We all need to own our choices, and who cares what other people think? I’ll admit that I’ve never read the Twilight books, or anything John Green, but millions of people like them very much. And I’m totally on board with wanting my books to look pretty to begin with, and stay pretty. (I’ll admit that I recently went on a buying spree of D.E. Stevenson books because they were reissued in very pretty editions. I’d never read any D.E. Stevenson. I’m now halfway through my first one, and fortunately I love it!)

  6. hurrah! i too will not apologize for my reading habits. i love chick lit, a great compelling biography, no matter who the subject is, and i definitely will not apologise for reading numerous mills and boon/ harlequin romance novels.
    Or any great cook book.

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